1995-97 SHSU Graduate Catalogue
COLLEGE OF
EDUCATION AND APPLIED SCIENCE


Index to the College of Education and Applied Science

  • Administrative Officers
  • Division of Agricultural Sciences
  • Department of Vocational Education
  • Department of Consumer Services, Fashion, and Design

  • Division of Health and Kinesiology

  • Department of Library Science
  • Division of Psychology and Philosophy
  • Teacher Education and Professional Certification Programs
  • Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations
  • Teaching Certificate Programs
  • Department of Technology and Photography

    ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

    Kenneth R. Craycraft, Ed.D., Dean, College of Education and Applied Science

    Hollis Lowery-Moore, Ed.D., Assistant Dean, College of Education and Applied Science

    Mary A. Berry, Ph.D., Acting Chair, Department of Library Science

    Genevieve H. Brown, Ed.D., Chair, Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling

    A. Jerry Bruce, Ph.D., Chair, Division of Psychology and Philosophy

    Robert L. Case, Ph.D., Chair, Division of Health and Kinesiology

    William R. Harrell, Ph.D., Chair, Division of Agricultural Sciences and Vocational Education

    John C. Huber, Ed.D., Chair, Department of Curriculum and Instruction

    Orville E. Jackson, Ed.D., Chair, Department of Technology and Photography

    Mary Eren Johnson, Ed.D., Acting Chair, Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations

    Bettye S. Weatherall, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Consumer Services, Fashion, and Design

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    DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
    AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

    The graduate program in agriculture is designed to further the professional competence of those individuals engaged in production agriculture, careers in agricultural related industries, and/or agricultural education and extension.
    The Master of Science degree in agriculture is designed to be a broad-based degree including thirty-six hours of course work. Eighteen hours will be from agribusiness, agricultural eduction, agricultural mechanization, animal science, horticulture, and agronomy. In addition, the curriculum includes a course in research methodology and a course in agricultural statistics. Twelve semester hours are designated as electives and can be taken in agriculture or from a related field. It may include courses in vocational education. The degree is designed to provide comprehensive knowledge and capabilities in several fields of agriculture. A thesis option is available and must have prior approval by the chair of the thesis committee. Degree candidates must pass a comprehensive examination over all graduate course work.

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    REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

    1. An undergraduate degree in agriculture or a related field.
    2. Earned a minimum grade point average of 2.5 (4.0 scale) on all previous college studies or a 2.8 on the last sixty semester hours of course work applicable to the baccalaureate degree.
    3. Score 800 or more on the Graduate Record Examination on the Verbal and Quantitative sections or score 950 or 1000 points on the Graduate Management Admissions Test based on the following formulas:

    200 X (overall GPA) + (GMAT score) � 950
    200 X (advanced hours GPA) + (GMAT score) � 1000

    4. Applicants from non-English speaking countries must present a score of at least 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

    For application forms or further information, write or call:
    Graduate Office

    College of Education and Applied Science
    Sam Houston State University
    Huntsville, TX 77341-2119
    Phone: (936) 294-1105
    FAX: (936) 294-1102

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    Required Courses: 24 hours

    AGR 535 Advanced Principles of Livestock Management 3 hours
    AGR 536 Contemporary Issues in Agribusiness 3 hours
    AGR 570 Food and Fiber Crops 3 hours
    AGR 575 Statistical Methods in Agriculture 3 hours
    AGR 594 Techniques of Applied Horticultural Science 3 hours
    AGR 635 Techniques and Interpretation of Research 3 hours
    500 level Agricultural Mechanization 3 hours
    500 level Agricultural Education 3 hours
    Electives (may be 400 (6 hours), 500 or 600 level) 12 hours

    Degree programs in agricultural mechanization and agricultural business are available through departmental approval

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    SENIOR COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS

    AGR 432 Fruit and Vegetable Production
    AGR 433 Soil Fertility Management and Fertilizers
    AGR 460 Livestock Management Techniques
    AGR 461 Agribusiness Organization and Management
    AGR 462 Land and Natural Resource Economics
    AGR 468 Landscape Design II
    AGR 470 Forage Crops and Pasture Management
    AGR 474 Agricultural Market Analysis and Prices
    AGR 475 Advanced Agribusiness Management
    AGR 477 Real Estate Appraisal
    AGR 480 Beef Cattle Production and Management
    AGR 481 Advanced Agricultural Mechanics
    AGR 482 Man, Food, and Nutrition: A Global Concern
    AGR 486 Agriculture and Government Programs
    AGR 487 Agricultural Engines and Tractors
    AGR 488 Principles of Agricultural Leadership and Community Development
    AGR 489 Animal Reproduction
    AGR 490 Animal Diseases and Parasites
    AGR 491 Advanced Horse Production and Management
    AGR 492 Food Preservation Technology
    AGR 494 Applied Animal Nutrition
    AGR 497 Integrated Pest Management
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    GRADUATE COURSES

    AGRICULTURE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    AGR 530 TECHNIQUES FOR JOINING METALLIC AND NON-METALLIC MATERIALS. Principles and techniques of bonding and fusing metallic materials by the electric and oxyacetylene processes. Study of fluxes, chemicals, and oxidants used in joining metal. Joining of non-metallic materials by mechanical and chemical means.
    AGR 531 MECHANIZED HARVESTING AND HANDLING OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. Fundamentals of selection, service, and operation of agricultural harvesting machines. Analysis and development of mechanical systems to feed and care for livestock. Storage and handling facilities for agricultural products.
    AGR 533 ADVANCED RURAL UTILITIES. Selection and use of electrical equipment as related to efficiency and economy in agricultural production, processing and storage of feeds, forage crops and grain in connection with livestock enterprises. Farm water systems are included.
    AGR 535 ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT. This course will provide a detailed knowledge of innovative and modern livestock management techniques.
    AGR 536 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS. This course will provide analysis and discussion of relevant topics with appropriate methodology and theory.
    AGR 560 AGRICULTURAL POLICY. Farmers organizations and government agricultural programs are analyzed. Contemporary economic problems in agriculture are studied.
    AGR 562 ADVANCED PLANT DISEASE CONTROLHORTICULTURAL CROPS. Diagnosis, epideminology, eradication, and control of plant diseases. Causative and limiting factors are stressed. Designed for prospective or practicing teachers and technicians in the agro-chemical industry or in federal or state plant control services.
    AGR 563 ADVANCED AGRONOMY. Breeding and improvement of field crops; relationship of soils to production, management, and utilization of field crops. Individual research on selected problems will be conducted.
    AGR 564 AGRICULTURAL INTERNSHIP. A directed study utilizing industry to develop an understanding of agricultural production and management principles.
    AGR 565 ANALYTICAL COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE. A course designed for students who desire additional computer instruction emphasizing data interpretation, analysis, and presentation for research and teaching. Instruction in software designed specifically for agriculture will be included. Prerequisites: AGR 575 and 3 hrs. computing science.
    AGR 567 INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURE. Distribution, quality and utilization of agriculture resources; variation in population density; world trade in agriculture; comparative advantage; national and international policies related to agriculture; and future trends and prospects.
    AGR 569 ADVANCED POULTRY SCIENCE. Advanced studies of the various phases of poultry production and technology. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and application of current research.
    AGR 570 FOOD AND FIBER CROPS. A study of traditional plant breeding techniques and an overview of contemporary crop improvement methods. The physiology, adaptation, classification, taxonomy, and utilization of major crop species used for production of food and fiber are covered. Genetic and environmental influences of crop quality are discussed.
    AGR 575 STATISTICAL METHODS IN AGRICULTURE. Applications of statistical methods for making meaningful interpretations of qualitative and quantitative data from experiments in agriculture. Instruction includes sampling and randomization, correlation and regression, analysis of variance and testing of hypotheses of means and variances, and design of experiments in agriculture.
    AGR 582 NUTRITIONAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL INTER-RELATIONSHIPS. The physiological functions of various body processes in domestic animals with emphasis on the metabolic relationships among minerals, vitamins, amino acids, fats, carbohydrates, enzymes, hormones and non-nutritive feed additives and the effect of nutritional antagonists.
    AGR 583 AGRICULTURAL MARKETING PROBLEMS. A study of agricultural marketing systems. The organization of growers markets and marketing programs are included.
    AGR 586 CAPITAL MANAGEMENT IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS. This course provided an in-depth understanding of capital marketing, capital budgeting, financial planning, and appraisal principles important in the field of agribusiness.
    AGR 594 TECHNIQUES OF APPLIED HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE. Critical survey of production and management techniques as applied in horticultural science.
    AGR 598 ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. Agricultural production principles applied to the use of resources; cost analyses of production enterprises; linear programming of enterprises for maximizing returns; elements of depreciation schedules; evaluation for income tax purposes.
    AGR 635 TECHNIQUES AND INTERPRETATIONS OF RESEARCH. A course designed to develop the competencies needed to interpret and utilize agricultural research. Topics will include: the philosophy of the scientific method, formats for agricultural research data, interpretation of data, application of information to specific situations.
    AGR 698,699 THESIS.

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    AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    AED 564 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. A directed individual investigation of advanced problems in Vocational Education.
    AED 572 ORGANIZATION OF YOUTH ACTIVITIES IN AGRICULTURE. The course covers the application of relevant concepts and principles in the organization and administration of effective programs for youth. Emphasis is placed on FFA activities and other youth organizations, supervised occupational experience programs, the determination of educational needs of out-of-school youth, and ways of administering programs to meet these needs.
    AED 578 ADVANCED INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. Learning theories, techniques, and processes to enhance the teaching of agricultural skills, providing supervised practice and evaluation of student achievement.

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    Vocational Education Program

    The graduate programs in Vocational Education are designed to accomplish the following basic purposes: to improve the professional competencies of the vocational teachers, to prepare teachers as vocational supervisors and counselors, to prepare for further graduate study at the doctoral level, and to provide advanced specialized training needed for leadership in commercial and industrial areas requiring a vocational background.
    Master of Education, Plan II. This degree plan is designed for secondary and post-secondary vocational teachers. A minimum of 36 hours of credit, 30 hours of which must be courses numbered 500 or above, is required. Twelve to 30 hours of Vocational Education are required. Six to 24 hours are included in one or two of the support areas such as: Agriculture, Home Economics, Industrial Education, and Education. A comprehensive examination is required.

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    VOCATIONAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    VED 562 OCCUPATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION INFORMATION. Techniques for surveying vocational program potentials in communities; existing vocational organizations and agencies; and community businesses related to vocational education. Methods of developing comprehensive programs of vocational education.
    VED 564 ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. A directed individual investigation of advanced problems in Vocational Education.
    VED 567 VOCATIONAL STUDENT IDENTIFICATION, PLACEMENT, AND FOLLOW-UP. Techniques for identifying students for vocational training; sources and means of job placement for cooperative part-time students and graduates of vocational programs; and methods of making student follow-up studies are included. Also listed as IE 582.
    VED 575 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. Basic philosophies of apprenticeship training, on-the-job training, cooperative education, and work experience education are appraised and efforts are made to determine underlying principles. Techniques of vocational curriculum construction are presented. Also listed as IT 568.
    VED 585 PLANNING AND ORGANIZING PROGRAMS OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE. Placement and educational opportunities for secondary and post-secondary students are studied under various vocational situations. A historical resume of the guidance movement is presented.

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    DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER SERVICES, FASHION, AND DESIGN

    Home Economics Program

    The graduate program in Home Economics is designed to provide advanced specialized leadership in various professions, and to further professional competences for students in extension, business, industry and education.
    The graduate program in Home Economics is designed to accomplish the following basic purposes:

    1. to develop leadership for home economics professions;
    2. to extend competencies for home economists in extension, business, industry and education; and
    3. to prepare promising students for doctoral study.
    The curriculum is organized to permit advanced study and research in the following areas:

    Child Development
    Clothing
    Family Economics, Equipment and Management
    Family Relations
    Foods and Nutrition
    Home Economics Education
    Housing and Furnishings
    Textiles

    Authorized degree program: Master of Arts degree with a major in Home Economics.
    Master of Arts, Plan I.

    Designed primarily for prospective college or secondary school teachers, study may be chosen in one area of Home Economics by selecting a majority of credit hours and a thesis topic in that area. The comprehensive examination must be taken in two areas of study in the major field and one primary area in the minor. Thesis required.
    Master of Arts, Plan II.

    Designed for prospective college or secondary school teachers who wish to take thirty-six semester hours in Home Economics, this plan provides for twelve semester hours of Home Economics. The comprehensive examination must be taken in two areas of study in the major field. A thesis is not required.

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    SENIOR COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS

    HE 460 Clinical Dietetics
    HE 467 Seminar in Clothing, Textiles and Merchandising
    HE 468x Research Problems
    HE 478 Advanced Nutrition

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    HOME ECONOMICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    HE 530 SEMINAR IN HOME ECONOMICS RESEARCH. A course designed to acquaint graduate students with the need for and contribution of research. Criteria are developed for designing and completing research.
    HE 567 THE CONSUMER AND FOOD TECHNOLOGY. Investigations of recent developments in food production and marketing; consideration of physical and chemical factors influencing the quality of food; implications and guidelines for the consumer.
    HE 575 SEMINAR IN RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN HOME ECONOMICS. A critical analysis of current trends, issues and problems in Home Economics. Course may be repeated for credit.
    HE 579 LABORATORY AND FIELD EXPERIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS. This course is composed of a supervised internship in an area of specialization. Course may be repeated for credit.
    HE 698 THESIS. The selection of a suitable problem, a review of related literature, the formulation of a plan of investigation and report. Preparation and approval of a prospectus.
    HE 699 THESIS. The completion and defense of the thesis.

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    HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    HEE 562 STUDIES IN EVALUATION IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION. Consideration is given to the evaluation of the total Home Economics program. Included is the analysis, construction, and development of measuring instruments and the interpretation of evaluation procedures.
    HEE 577 WORKSHOP IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION. Principles and procedures in planning, organizing, and developing occupational training programs using knowledge and skills within the discipline of Home Economics are stressed. Emphasis is on curriculum, space, equipment, methods, and teaching materials peculiar to these programs.

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    DIVISION OF HEALTH AND KINESIOLOGY

    Health Program

    This program of study aims to prepare qualified individuals for positions as health education specialists with public schools, as well as a variety of community health settings. The qualified health educator has a good understanding of (1) people and factors which influence their learning; (2) purposes, principles, methods, and techniques of the communicative arts (writing, speaking, teaching, group work); and (3) community organization. The goal of the health education specialist is more effective interpretation of health activities and health information so that greater understanding, more intelligent participation, and better attitudes and behavior will result among people.
    While the primary purpose of this program is to prepare students to function as teachers or as staff members, experienced individuals in the field of public health may qualify for positions of greater responsibility, such as health education coordinators in medical services (health maintenance organization, nursing homes, hospitals, physicians' offices, etc.), comprehensive health planning, communication, and administrators of public health education.
    The students knowledge in all areas of course work, exclusive of thesis, will be evaluated during the comprehensive examination. Scores for either the Graduate Records Examination or the Miller Analogies Test must be submitted before students are admitted to Graduate Studies.
    A student majoring in Health may choose from: Master of Arts, Plan I; Master of Arts, Plan II; and Master of Education, Plan II.
    Master of Arts, Plan I (thesis option)
    Under this thirty-six semester hour plan, the student will take thirty semester hours of course work in Health (or approved electives) and six semester hours of thesis work. The work will be divided as follows:
    1. Twelve hour core curriculum including three hours of research and three hours of statistics.
    2. Six hours of field work preparation and field work experience with an approved health agency or organization.
    3. Six hours of thesis work.
    4. Additional graduate work to complete thirty-six hours.
    Master of Arts, Plan II (non-thesis option)
    Under this thirty-six semester hour plan, the student will take all course work in Health (or approved electives). These hours will be divided as follows:
    1. Twelve hour core curriculum including three hours of research and three hours of statistics.
    2. Six hours field work preparation and field work experience with an approved health agency or organization.
    3. Additional graduate work to complete thirty-six hours.
    Master of Education, Plan II. This plan is designed specifically for secondary school teachers and the course work should be distributed as follows: (1) eighteen to twenty-four hours in a teaching field(s) for secondary school teachers for which the student has eighteen or more undergraduate hours and the University offers sufficient graduate course work, (2) twelve to eighteen hours of Education.
    The Health courses taken under this plan should consist of three hours of research, three hours of statistics, and additional courses approved by a graduate advisor.

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    SENIOR COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS

    Selected 400-level offerings may be applied toward graduate degree with approval of the coordinator of the Health Program. Consult the undergraduate catalogue for course descriptions.

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    HEALTH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    HED 531 FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNITY HEALTH. The epidemiological and biostatistical method of investigating health problems. Includes historical and philosophical foundations of community health with an orientation to current health programs and problems.
    HED 532 HUMAN ECOLOGY. A study of the major factors which determine health or illness, including how man responds to physical, social, and emotional influences.
    HED 533 COLLOQUIUM IN HUMAN SEXUALITY. A study of all the factors influencing growth and development. Consideration of the special problems of developing family life and sex education programs in the schools.
    HED 534 COLLOQUIUM IN THE USE AND ABUSE OF DRUGS. Value education approach to the prevention of drug use and abuse. Personal, family, community and school factors influencing drug use. Origins and derivations of drugs. The mental, emotional, physical, social and genetic results from the use of drugs will be analyzed.
    HED 535 MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAMS. This course includes theories and practices and emphasizes methods for implementation.
    HED 537 HEALTH PLANNING. A comprehensive review of the National Planning and Resources Development Act. Topics included are history of planning, models for planning, and methodology for health planning. Theory, research, and evaluation techniques related to planning will be reviewed.
    HED 538 COLLOQUIUM IN CONSUMER HEALTH EDUCATION. The study of consumer goods and services as related to the health of man, his family and his community. Critical drug products, mail-order diet foods, fads and advertising.
    HED 560 COMMUNICATION THEORY AND PRACTICE FOR COMMUNITY EDUCATORS. A laboratory experience built around research on motivation concepts, the influence of perception, attitudes and values on behavior, on directing change, diffusion patterns, group discussion and decision making, and interviewing techniques. Attention given to the selection, use, and evaluation of media, materials, visual aids, press, radio, mass media, etc.
    HED 561 THEORY AND PRACTICE IN HEALTH EDUCATION. A study of the history, philosophy, and practices of Health Education. Exploration and application of behavioral science concepts and methodologies to community health education and inservice training of health professionals. Case studies and other practice models will be used.
    HED 565 AGING AND HEALTH PROMOTION. A discussion of health promotion issues for the elderly including physical assessment, chronic care, health care maintenance, psychological adaptation, nutrition, and other current topics.
    HED 574 RESEARCH SEMINAR. A study is made of research techniques, identification of problems, research designs and data gathering procedures pertinent to the field of health.
    HED 575 STATISTICAL DESIGN IN HEALTH AND KINESIOLOGY. Principles of advanced statistical techniques and measurement theory with emphasis upon their application to health, kinesiology, and related areas will be presented.
    HED 577 INDEPENDENT STUDIES. The student with specific interest and background experience in a specialized area will have the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts in a laboratory situation. He/she may have practical experiences in a clinic, agency, special school or other types of institutions. Prerequisite: Permission of the Division Chair.
    HED 696 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FOR HEALTH EDUCATION: INTERNSHIP. A comprehensive review of the components of health program planning with emphasis on the socioeconomical, cultural, and political factors that influence the health status of a community. Emphasis is focused on a comprehensive approach to health program planning models.
    HED 697 INTERNSHIP IN HEALTH EDUCATION. A continuation of HED 696. Emphasis is on directed field experience in official, voluntary health and social agencies, and schools under the supervision of a qualified health educator or approved preceptor.

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    Kinesiology Program

    The graduate program in Kinesiology is designed to accomplish the following basic purposes: increase the professional expertise of teachers and coaches, to prepare students for positions in corporate, commercial, and hospital health care programs, to prepare students for sports management positions, and to prepare students interested inpursuing doctoral degrees.
    The student's knowledge in all areas of course work, exclusive of the thesis, will be evaluated during the comprehensive examination. Scores for either the Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Section) or the Miller Analogies Test must be submitted before students are admitted to Graduate Studies. A composite score of 800 or more on the aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination is required; or, a score of 50 or more on the Miller Analogies Test.

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    DEGREE PROGRAMS IN KINESIOLOGY

    A student majoring or minoring in Kinesiology may choose from: Master of Arts, Plan I; Master of Arts, Plan II; Master of Education, Plan I; Master of Education Plan II. The professional applications for each degree are described below:
    Master of Arts, Plan I. This plan is designed to prepare individuals for college teaching and for students who wish to pursue doctoral studies in the future.
    Master of Arts, Plan II. This plan is designed to prepare teachers, coaches, adaptive physical education and commercial and corporate fitness managers.
    Master of Education, Plan I. This plan is designed for elementary teachers who are Education majors and who choose to minor in Kinesiology.
    Master of Education, Plan II. This plan is designed for secondary education majors who choose to minor in Kinesiology.
    Students may elect to concentrate in such areas as teacher-coach, fitness management, or adapted Kinesiology with the selection of course work to be determined at the time of academic advisement. All students are required to complete a research course and statistics course.

    MASTER OF ARTS, PLAN I (Thesis Option)

    Under this thirty semester hour plan, the student will take twenty-four semester hours of course work in Kinesiology and six semester hours (KIN 698, 699) for the thesis.

    MASTER OF ARTS, PLAN II (Non-thesis Option)

    Under this thirty-six semester hour plan, the student will take all course work in Kinesiology.
    Graduate-level courses from related disciplines are permissible with approval of the Division Chair.

    MASTER OF EDUCATION, PLAN I

    This plan is designed for majors in Elementary Education who wish to minor in Kinesiology. The thirty-six hour degree program is divided as follows:
    1. a major of eighteen to twenty-four hours in education
    2. a minor of twelve to eighteen semester hours in Kinesiology

    MASTER OF EDUCATION, PLAN II

    Within this thirty-six hour degree plan the student may take twelve to twenty-four hours in Kinesiology, six to twelve hours in a second teaching field, and twelve to eighteen hours in Education.
    Selected 400-level offerings may be applied toward graduate degree with approval of the Chair of the Division of Health and Kinesiology. Consult the undergraduate catalogue for course descriptions.

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    KINESIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    KIN 534 PRACTICUM. Culminating course. On-site teaching experience in personal working environment or special internship arranged. Supervisory assistance by project staff at frequent intervals. Periodic seminars.
    KIN 567 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE. Advanced content which reflects the scientific principles underlying exercise is coupled with a heavy emphasis on laboratory experiences. Students will be required to conduct an applied research project on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: KIN 373 or permission of instructor.
    KIN 570 ADVANCED COACHING TECHNIQUES. Emphasis is given to the analysis, presentation and evaluation of playing skills and team strategies employed in interscholastic athletic programs.
    KIN 574 RESEARCH SEMINAR. A study is made of research techniques, identification of problems, research designs and data gathering procedures.
    KIN 575 STATISTICAL DESIGN IN HEALTH AND KINESIOLOGY. Principles of advanced statistical techniques and measurement theory with emphasis upon their application to health, kinesiology, and related areas will be presented.
    KIN 577 INDEPENDENT STUDIES. This course is adaptable to the needs and interests of the individual student. Students with specific interests are provided the opportunity to investigate and make application in theoretical, laboratory, or field experience approaches to their area of concentration. May be repeated provided the repetition is in a different area of study. Prerequisites: KIN 574 and permission of Division Chair.
    KIN 579 MANAGEMENT OF ADULT FITNESS PROGRAMS. An analysis of factors associated with the development and conduct of adult fitness and cardiac rehabilitation programs. Special attention will be given to standards established by the American College of Sports Medicine leading to certification of Fitness Instructor.
    KIN 588 SPORT MANAGEMENT. Central to this course is an analysis of effective administrative practices in school and college programs of kinesiology and sports. Special emphasis will be given to the areas of finance, legal liability, public relations, and principles of personnel management.
    KIN 589 SPORTS IN AMERICAN CULTURE. A study is made of cultural derivations of sporting patterns from antiquity to the contemporary era. Emphasis is placed on sports participation in relation to social structures, subcultures and human values.
    KIN 590 THE DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED SKILLS IN KINESIOLOGY. This course is designed to improve awareness of the analytical skills required in the diagnosis of performance errors in team and individual sports, aquatics, and gymnastics. Emphasis is given to instructional strategies which may be used to facilitate motor skill acquisition.
    KIN 592 A DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAM OF KINESIOLOGY FOR EARLY AND MIDDLE CHILDHOOD. This course is designed to provide an understanding of the sequence and relationship of motor development and perceptual activity throughout the pre-school years. It includes experiences related to readiness for learning physical skills, movement education approaches, and curricular content for early childhood.
    KIN 593 ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT. Concepts and theories are presented which concern the psychological factors involved in sports and their effects on performance.
    KIN 595 ADVANCED BIOMECHANICS. A study is made of the efficient use of the human body in work, play and rest. Emphasis is placed on muscular structure, mechanical and neurological aspects. Prerequisite: KIN 362 or permission of instructor.
    KIN 598 SIGNIFICANCE OF MOTOR LEARNING. This course will present the theoretical and experimental bases for the understanding of human behavior in movement. Areas of study include, movement, perception, motivation, exceptional performance, personality, and maturation.
    KIN 599 WORKSHOP IN KINESIOLOGY, RECREATION, AND SPORT. An intensive laboratory-oriented experience for practitioners seeking to upgrade teaching, coaching, or leadership competencies in areas related to Kinesiology, Coaching, and Athletics. May be repeated for credit with approval of Division Chair.
    KIN 631 FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT IN KINESIOLOGY. A study of guidelines for planning and evaluation of kinesiology and recreational facilities. Consideration will be given to factors associated with the acquisition and maintenance of equipment.
    KIN 698 THESIS. This phase of the thesis investigation includes the completion of the review of the related literature, formulation of the research design and procedures and related pilot studies. Some data collection may also occur, and the thesis symposium must be completed to the satisfaction of the advisor and members of the thesis committee.
    KIN 699 THESIS. This phase of thesis work includes the completion of the data collection, as well as the actual writing and defense of the thesis.

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    DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE

    The Department of Library Science is charged with applying the University's mission specifically to the field of Library and Information Science. The goals of the Department of Library Science are to: 1) prepare competent professionals for school librarianship; 2) encourage and support scholarly research and publications; 3) promote and participate in faculty growth and development; 4) offer educational services to schools, libraries, and the community; and 5) plan, implement, and evaluate the academic curriculum, teaching effectiveness, physical resources, program policies, and the learning environment.
    Master of Library Science (MLS). This 36-hour degree provides for the principles and procedures common to libraries and information centers. The primary mission of the Department of Library Science is the preparation of school library media specialists for grades pre-K-12.
    Required courses include: LS 530, LS 532, LS 534, LS 537, LS 560, LS 564, LS 570, LS 585, LS 596, 3 electives.

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    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

    Students who wish to pursue the MLS degree should request the Application for Admission to the Master of Library Science Program from the Department of Library Science, Sam Houston State University, P.O. Box 2236, Huntsville, Texas 77341. This form is in addition to the Graduate Application for Admission which must be completed and filed with the Dean, College of Education and Applied Science.

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    LEARNING RESOURCES ENDORSEMENT

    This is the credential required for school library media specialists for employment in Texas schools including the Windham School System of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice Institutional Division.
    This credential may be issued to one who has a Bachelor's Degree, a valid Texas teacher's certificate, 21 approved semester hours, 3 semester hours of practicum working in a Learning Resources Center or 3 additional semester hours directly related to learning resources course work and one year of successful experience on a permit as a full-time public school librarian. A passing score on the Examination for the Certification of Educators in Texas (ExCET) is required.
    Six of the seven courses necessary for the Library Learning Resources Endorsement are LS 530, LS 532, LS 534, LS 537, LS 570, and LS 585. The final course is LS 566, Library Internship. LS 585 satisfies the state of Texas multi-ethnic course requirement. LS 560 is a Department of Library Science requirement for the Learning Resources Endorsement (LRE). No Library Science course which is over six (6) years old is acceptable towards a Learning Resources Endorsement. Application for this Endorsement is made through the Teacher Certification Officer, College of Education and Applied Science. Note prerequisites under individual courses.

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    PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY LEARNING RESOURCES SPECIALIST CERTIFICATION

    This professional certificate is issued to one who has a Bachelor's Degree, a valid Texas teacher certificate, three years teaching experience, basic understanding of multicultural and multiethnic elements in society, 36 Library Science semester hours and a passing score on the ExCET test. The 36 hours includes LS 530, LS 532, LS 534, LS 537, LS 570, LS 585, and LS 566. In addition to these requirements, two professional education courses must be taken at the graduate level. These six hours are subject to the approval of the Teacher Certification Officer, College of Education and Applied Science.

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    LIBRARY SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    LS 510 PROBLEMS. Short-term workshops for highly concentrated instruction in specific areas of Library Science skills and knowledge. May be repeated as topics vary.
    LS 530 COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT. Principles of selection of library materials and procedures involved in building library collections. Latest trends and evaluation of research. Required for LRE and MLS..
    LS 532 ORGANIZATION OF COLLECTIONS I. Introduction to the principles of descriptive cataloging and classification and subject analysis. The Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd ed. rev., Dewey Decimal Classification, 20th ed., the Sears List of Subject Headings, 14th ed., and ALA Filing Rules and an overview of technical services, processing centers, bibliographic control, and commercial cataloging utilities. Required for LRE and MLS.
    *LS 533 FOUNDATIONS OF LIBRARIANSHIP. The purpose of the course is to give students a thorough grounding in the concepts, behaviors, and issues inherent in librarianship and in particular, concerning school library media specialists. Elective.
    LS 534 INFORMATION SERVICES AND RESOURCES I. Skills, techniques, and philosophy of the reference process with emphasis on the interview and strategy. Examination and discussion of basic reference tools using specific evaluative criteria. Analysis of library systems, networks, automated data bases, latest trends and research in the field of reference. Required for the LRE and MLS.
    LS 537 SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER ADMINISTRATION. Planning, organizing, policy making, staffing, budgeting, facilities planning, decision making and services. Study of standards and trends and evaluation of research. Required for the LRE and MLS.. Prerequisites: LS 530, 532, 534.
    LS 560 LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN. Acquaints students with the selection, critical analysis, and historical development of literature for children. Emphasis will be placed on selecting recreational and informational materials for children reflecting our multicultural society; identifying techniques, activities, and strategies which motivate children to read and respond to literature; and developing critical abilities for evaluating literature for children. Required for LRE and MLS.
    LS 561 CURRENT TRENDS IN MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS. Introduction to recent trends in materials for children and young adults with emphasis on multicultural understanding. Elective. Prerequisites: LS 560, 585
    LS 563 ORGANIZATION OF COLLECTIONS II. Concentrated and advanced study of the principles of cataloging, classification, and subject analysis. Focuses on The Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd ed., rev., and emphasizes the special problems of non book materials, including films, video cassettes, video discs, sound recordings, compact discs, kits, and computer software. Evaluation of the latest trends and research in cataloging, classification, subject analysis, and technical services management. Elective. Prerequisite: LS 532.
    LS 564 INFORMATION SERVICES AND RESOURCES II. Surveys the new technological developments having an impact on reference and information services including online communications, CD-ROMs, laser discs, and multimedia packages. Covers information highways fostering networking (i.e., Internet, RESNET, and NREN) as well as vendors such as DIALOG, BRS, Wilsonline, and First Search. Issues related to reference automation, proposals, budgetary considerations, and ethics are covered. Required for MLS. Prerequisite: LS 534.
    LS 566 LIBRARY INTERNSHIP. Supervised practice in a school library, incorporating seminars, conferences, journal, and evaluation. Required for the LRE. Prerequisites: LS 530, 532, 533, 534, 537, 560, 570, 585.
    *LS 567 RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY. A study of research techniques, identification of problems, research designs, and data-gathering procedures pertinent to the field of library science. Planning, production and evaluation of proposals. Survey of the application of research findings for the improvement of library management and services. Elective. Prerequisite: LS 537.
    LS 568 LIBRARY SERVICES AND PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS. Programming of children and young adult services, including promotional activities, storytelling, book talks, reading guidance, library skills and instruction, innovative projects and informal library use. Study of trends and evaluation of research in the area. Elective. Prerequisite: LS 560.
    LS 570 INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND LIBRARY MEDIA PRODUCTION. Design and development of curriculum which utilizes the systematic approach to instruction. Emphasis on explicitly stated objectives, appropriate teaching strategies, and production of materials to facilitate achievement of goals using the latest in instructional technologies, including multimedia. Required for LRE and MLS.
    LS 575 DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL STUDY IN LIBRARY SCIENCE. Independent research based on submitted research proposal. Elective. Prerequisite: Requires approval of Department Chair.
    LS 580 MASTER'S SEMINAR. In-depth study of specialized subjects. May be repeated as topics vary. Examples of topics:
    Integrated On-Line Library Systems
    Nonfiction Literature for Children and Young Adults
    Selecting and Evaluating Multicultural Materials for Youth
    Teacher/Librarian Cooperation Emphasizing Creative Thinking
    Update for School Library Learning Resources Specialists
    Elective. Prerequisites: Appropriate required courses and approval of the Department Chair.
    LS 585 LITERATURE FOR YOUNG ADULTS. A study of materials based upon personal and curriculum-related needs of young adults in a multicultural society. The preparation of reviews, oral and written reports, critical evaluations of print and nonprint literature-based media, booktalking, strategies for reading motivation, and the sharing of reading experiences are included. Required for LRE and MLS.
    LS 591 TECHNOLOGY OF LIBRARY INFORMATION SYSTEMS. Concentrated and advanced study of public access catalogs, with emphasis on bibliographic input standards documents, retrospective conversion, and database development. Examination of interlibrary loan and resource sharing local area networks, Tenet, and Internet capabilities. Elective.
    LS 593 THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF LITERATURE FOR CHILDREN. Examination of the historical development of a separate literature for children. Traces the history from the earliest books for children to current trends and issues in the field. Elective. Prerequisite: LS 560.
    LS 596 COMPUTER SCIENCE APPLICATIONS TO LIBRARIANSHIP. History and current status of automated library services. Examination of the international standards, hardware, and software commercially available to support cataloging, circulation, online catalogs, reference services, and administrative tasks. Required for MLS. Prerequisites: LS 530, 532, 534, 570.
    LS 610 ADVANCED LITERATURE AND REFERENCE TOPICS. Literature, reference tools, and techniques unique to various disciplines including online and CD-ROM technology. Elective.


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    DIVISION OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY

    Psychology Program

    The Division of Psychology and Philosophy offers Master of Arts degrees in Psychology, Psychology-Clinical Psychology, and Psychology-School Psychology. The Clinical and School options are 45-hour programs including 9 hours of practicum experience, 6 hours of thesis, and 30 hours of approved course work. The general option is a 36-hour program that includes 30 hours of approved course work and 6 hours of thesis. The programs are designed (1) to prepare students either for certification as Psychological Associates by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists or for licensure as Licensed Professional Counselors by The State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors, (2) to prepare the student for further graduate work, and/or (3) to prepare students for junior college teaching.
    Minimum requirements for regular admission include (1) a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average (GPA); (2) a 1000 (verbal plus quantitative) score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or a 50 on the Miller Analogies Test (MAT); and (3) three letters of recommendation. Students may not begin graduate study without a complete application, including test scores and recommendations, on file. Conditional admission is occasionally granted to applicants who do not meet all of these numerical criteria, but all applications must be complete (with test scores and letters) before any form of admission is possible.
    In addition, all students take the Advanced Psychology Test of the Graduate Record Examination before continuing beyond 18 hours of graduate study. Failure to meet minimum requirements on the exam blocks the student from further graduate classes.

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
    PSY 530 ADVANCED ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. An advanced study is made of behavioral disorders, their development, diagnosis, and treatment.
    PSY 531 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. This course surveys the science of psychology, studying the biological, perceptual, developmental and social determinants of behavior, emotion, and cognition.
    PSY 532 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. A study is made of social factors that influence individual behavior. Consideration is given to social perception, prejudice and sexism, aggression, interpersonal attraction, conformity, and group behavior.
    PSY 533 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN PSYCHOTHERAPY I. This course is a comparative analysis of different systems and techniques of psychotherapy. The role of therapist, client, and setting are examined along with ethical principles.
    PSY 534 THEORY AND RESEARCH IN PSYCHOTHERAPY II. Selected techniques of psychotherapy are examined in detail. Topics may include therapy for sexual dysfunction and principles of group therapy.
    PSY 535 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. This is a course designed for studies in individually selected topics not specifically provided for in the formal course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of division chair and instructor.
    *PSY 536 ADVANCED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY. This course is designed to give an in-depth examination of the study of mental operations. Topics to be covered will include brain organization, neural bases of attention, memory, language, knowledge representations, hemispheric asymmetry, and artificial intelligence.
    PSY 539 ADVANCED SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. A study is made of the psychologist's role in public schools in the diagnosis and treatment of disordered behavior.
    PSY 560 ADVANCED PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. This course is designed to advance the student's knowledge of the biological substrates of behavior. Particular attention is given to psychoactive chemical effects.
    PSY 561 NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY. This course includes a study of the field of behavioral pharmacology: the systematic study of the effects of drugs on behavior and the way in which behavioral principles can help in understanding how drugs work. The focus is on the neurophysiological mechanisms of action of various psychoactive drugs and on the various neurotransmitter systems within the nervous system. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit 3.
    PSY 581 ADVANCED LEARNING THEORY. This course is a close inspection of the paradigms and phenomena of learning and their theoretical underpinnings.
    PSY 587 ADVANCED STATISTICS. This course is an advanced study of statistical methods including topics such as complex designs, parametric and nonparametric methods and multivariate statistics. Prerequisite: PSY 387 or equivalent.
    PSY 588 INTRODUCTION TO EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN. A study is made of the principles of design and analysis including randomized and factorial designs with emphasis upon applications to problems in psychological research. Prerequisite: PSY 587.
    PSY 594 PSYCHOMETRICS I: GROUP TESTS. A study is made of group tests and scales that measure achievement, aptitude, intelligence, interest and personality. Limited practicum is required.
    PSY 595 PSYCHOMETRICS II: INDIVIDUAL TESTS OF INTELLIGENCE. The course provides supervised instruction and practice in the administration, scoring, reporting of results, and interpretation of the Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Scales. Prerequisites: PSY 594 or equivalent.
    PSY 596 PSYCHOMETRICS III: INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT. A study is made of the use of the Rorschach and other instruments expected to be found in a complete clinical battery.
    PSY 597 ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. The course provides an advanced study of growth and development processes throughout the life cycle. It includes a study of physical, social, and psychological factors involved in life change.
    PSY 691 PRACTICUM I. The practicum experience is designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to bring theory and practice together and to develop his/her skills as a psychologist in meeting the needs of those experiencing difficulty in living, e.g., emotional problems, inadequate functioning in a learning environment, AIDS, terminal illness, marital adjustment, etc. Ethical issues in the treatment of these persons is also covered in detail.
    PSY 692 PRACTICUM II. The practicum experience is designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to bring theory and practice together and to develop his/her skills as a psychologist in meeting the needs of those experiencing difficulty in living, e.g., emotional problems, inadequate functioning in a learning environment, AIDS, terminal illness, marital adjustment, etc. Ethical issues in the treatment of these persons is also covered in detail.
    PSY 693 PRACTICUM III. The practicum experience is designed to provide the graduate student with an opportunity to bring theory and practice together and to develop his/her skills as a psychologist in meeting the needs of those experiencing difficulty in living, e.g., emotional problems, inadequate functioning in a learning environment, AIDS, terminal illness, marital adjustment, etc. Ethical issues in the treatment of these persons is also covered in detail.
    PSY 698 THESIS I. This phase of the Thesis investigation includes review of the literature, foundation of the research design, collection of pilot data, etc.
    PSY 699 THESIS II. This phase of Thesis work includes data collection, writing, and defense of Thesis.

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    TEACHER EDUCATION AND
    PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS
    Department of Curriculum and Instruction
    Elementary Education
    Secondary Education

    Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling
    Administration
    Supervision
    Counseling

    Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations
    Bilingual Education
    Early Childhood
    Reading
    Special Education

    Graduate programs in education can include various combinations of courses from these three departments. All such degrees are designed to accomplish the following basic purposes: to improve and extend the professional competence of early childhood, elementary, and secondary teachers, to prepare teachers for special positions in the schools, and to prepare students for doctoral work in university graduate programs.
    The degree plans listed below can lead to Professional Certification or Licensure in Texas. Certification candidates must apply for certification through the Certification Office, pass the appropriate ExCET tests, and attain the required years of teaching experience. For additional information about certification, contact the SHSU Certification Office. For licensure requirements see Master of Arts in Counseling (Plan II).

    Master of Education in Elementary Education (Plan I). This degree plan is designed specifically for the elementary teacher. All such degrees originate in the office of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Students pursuing this plan must either hold elementary teacher certification or complete it prior to being awarded the degree. The degree plan requires the completion of a minimum of thirty-six hours of graduate credit, thirty hours of which must be in courses numbered 500 or above.
    The major consists of eighteen to twenty-four semester hours in Education which are approved in conference.
    The minor consists of twelve to eighteen semester hours in an approved subject in which the student has at least eighteen undergraduate hours. Exceptions to the prerequisite requirement for a minor include: Early Childhood Education, Special Education, Reading, Bilingual Education, English as a Second Language, Gifted and Talented, Mid-Management Administration, Counseling, and Library Science, for which no prerequisite hours are necessary.
    A comprehensive examination covering course work in Education and the minor field must be taken and passed prior to graduation.
    In addition to the above, a specialized program in Early Childhood Education is available for the student who holds a Texas Provisional Elementary or Vocational Home Economics teaching certificate. The master's program in Early Childhood Education is an interdisciplinary plan with courses taken from a variety of subject fields. For more information, please contact the Department of Language, Literacy and Special Populations.

    Master of Education in Secondary Education (Plan II). This degree plan is designed specifically for the secondary teacher. All such degrees originate in the office of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and require the completion of a minimum of thirty-six hours of graduate credit, thirty of which must be in courses numbered 500 or above. (Eighteen hours in a single teaching field or twelve hours in dual teaching fields approved for secondary school teachers and for which the student has eighteen or more undergraduate hours and the University offers sufficient graduate course work are required.) Twelve to eighteen hours of professional education course work are required (twelve hours minimum for dual teaching fields/eighteen hours minimum for single teaching field.)

    Master of Education in Administration (Plan III). This degree plan is designed specifically for the student who wishes to work toward a certificate in Mid-Management Administration. It requires the completion of a minimum of thirty-six hours of graduate credit. The program must comply with existing standards for professional certification. A comprehensive examination will be taken upon the completion of or during the final semester of course work. The degree plan originates in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling.

    Master of Education in Supervision (Plan III). This degree plan is designed specifically for the student who wishes to work toward a certificate in Professional Supervision or Professional Vocational Supervision. It requires the completion of a minimum of thirty-six hours of graduate credit. The program must comply with existing standards for professional certification. A comprehensive examination will be taken upon the completion of or during the final semester of course work. The degree plan originates in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling.

    Master of Education in Counseling (Plan III). This degree plan is designed specifically for the student who wishes to work toward certification in School Counseling. It requires the completion of a minimum of thirty-six hours of graduate credit. The program must comply with existing standards for professional certification. A comprehensive examination will be taken upon the completion of or during the final semester of course work. The degree plan originates in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling.

    Master of Arts in Counseling (Plan II). At the time of printing and subject to action of the Board of Regents, The Texas State University System and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, a request has been made for authorization to confer the Master of Arts degree with a major in Counseling. Any further reference to the above-mentioned degree is contingent upon the action of the Board of Regents, The Texas State University System and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.
    This degree plan is designed for students seeking licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). Students completing this degree will have all of the academic requirements needed to apply for the temporary license as a Professional Counselor in the state of Texas. Nine graduate semester credit hours in addition to the 36-hour program are required to fulfill LPC requirements. A comprehensive examination will be taken upon the completion of or during the final semester of course work. The degree plan originates in the Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling.

    Master of Education in Early Childhood Education (Plan III). This degree plan is designed for those holding a Texas Provisional Elementary or Vocational Home Economics teaching certificate. The master's program in Early Childhood Education is an interdisciplinary plan with courses taken for a variety of subject fields. The degree plan originates in the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations.

    Master of Education in Reading (Plan III). This degree plan is designed for those holding a Texas Provisional Elementary or Secondary teaching certificate. It can lead to certification as a Reading Specialist in Texas. The degree plan originates in the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations.

    Master of Education in Special Education (Plan III). This degree plan is designed for those holding a Texas Provisional Elementary or Secondary teaching certificate. It can lead to either Generic Special Education or Diagnostician Certification in Texas. The degree plan originates in the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations.

    Master of Arts, Plan I. This degree plan is designed for individuals who wish to write a thesis as part of the requirements for the degree. It is available to majors in Elementary Education, Secondary Education, Special Education, Counselor Education, Administration, Supervision, Counseling, and Reading. A comprehensive examination will be taken upon the completion of or during the final semester of course work. The degree plan originates in the appropriate department. The course work for these degrees can also be applied to Texas Professional Certification.

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    DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

    GRADUATE COURSES

    ELEMENTARY EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    EED 510 WORKSHOP IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. This course is designed to explore current topics which affect elementary teachers. One semester hour is offered and the course may be repeated for a maximum of three times.
    EED 531 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER EDUCATION. An introduction to computers in the classroom with emphasis on software, types of computers, and practical applications.
    EED 561 PROBLEMS IN TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS. Emphasis in the course is placed on discussing the problems of teaching oral and written English and determining how to integrate the processes of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the public school classroom. Research findings that indicate the relationship of language arts to other areas of the curriculum are examined.
    EED 583 INTEGRATING CURRENT TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING. Laboratory experiences are provided for graduate students in the preparation, selection, and use of audio-visual materials for teaching and in the operation of audio-visual equipment. This course is recommended for both education and non-education majors.
    EED 584 THE CURRICULUM IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. Development of the elementary school curriculum and significant factors which help to determine the curriculum construction are studied. Opportunity to select and organize appropriate learning experiences for the different levels is offered.
    EED 587 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION. The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.
    EED 590 ADVANCED METHODS IN CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND DISCIPLINE. This course is designed for K-12 teachers of all subject areas. Increased proficiency in classroom management skills is the primary objective of the course. Teachers will be provided with an understanding of the factors influencing individual and group behavior in school settings; methods of diagnosing school and classroom factors that may be eliciting the problem; and the options available for influencing student behaviors.
    EED 591 PROBLEMS IN TEACHING ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS. Study is made of recent trends in elementary mathematics programs and instructional approaches. Application of research findings to improving the teaching and learning of mathematics is emphasized.
    EED 592 PROBLEMS IN TEACHING ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. Study is made of recent trends in elementary science programs and instructional approaches. Applications of research findings to improving the teaching and learning of science is emphasized.
    *EED 593 ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING. Study is made of typical methods of measuring intelligence, achievement, special aptitudes, and personality. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and use of tests and on alternative means of assessment. Elementary statistical terms and processes are mastered.
    EED 596 PROBLEMS IN TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES. Study is made of recent trends in elementary social studies programs and instructional approaches. Application of research findings to improving the teaching and learning of social studies is emphasized.
    *EED 597 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. A review of theory and current research concerning the growth and development of the individual through the life span with emphasis on childhood and adolescence. This course attempts to relate theory and research to present concerns and problems of teachers through the study of physiological, psychological, and social inter-relationships. Experience in the procedures of child study are provided.
    *EED 598 INTERNSHIP IN THE ELEMENTARY TEACHING. This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines.
    *EED 599 INTERNSHIP IN THE ELEMENTARY TEACHING. This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines.
    EED 667 INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT AND COACHING STRATEGIES FOR THE MENTOR TEACHER. This course is designed to enhance the supervisory and instructional skills of experienced teachers and provide strategies for them to use in the mentoring of beginning teachers. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of the research on effective teaching, the role of teacher mentor, and the use of the coaching model.
    EED 670 CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND REFLECTION FOR TEACHING. This course is designed for classroom teachers of all subject and grade levels. The focus of this course is to prepare teachers to read published research critically, to integrate those finding with personal experience in order to make reflective instructional decision and to participate in pedagogical research and theory-building.

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    SECONDARY EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    SED 531 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER EDUCATION. An introduction to computers in the classroom with emphasis on software, types of computers, and practical applications.
    SED 560 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. Study is made of current teaching techniques, strategies and materials. Students will identify, research and develop approaches to problems pertaining to their teaching field.
    SED 568 INTRODUCTION TO THE MIDDLE SCHOOL. A review of the theory and practice of the modern American Middle School. This course will include history, philosophy, organizations and trends in middle school education. Three-day long visits to successful middle schools will be included in the course.
    SED 583 INTEGRATING CURRENT TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING. Laboratory experiences are provided for graduate students in the preparation, selection, and use of audio-visual materials for teaching and in the operation of audio-visual equipment. This course is recommended for both education and non-education majors.
    SED 587 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION. The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.
    SED 590 ADVANCED METHODS IN CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND DISCIPLINE. This course is designed for K-12 teachers of all subject areas. Increased proficiency in classroom management skills is the primary objective of the course. Teachers will be provided with an understanding of the factors influencing individual and group behavior in school settings; methods of diagnosing school and classroom factors that may be eliciting the problem; and the options available for influencing student behaviors.
    *SED 593 ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING. Study is made of typical methods of measuring intelligence, achievement, special aptitudes, and personality. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and use of tests. Elementary statistical terms and processes are mastered.
    SED 594 THE SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM. The course is planned to give the mature student a knowledge of the numerous factors which help to determine the offerings of the secondary school. Recent and current trends in curriculum revision and research which provide basis for the need for change in major areas of the secondary school curriculum are studied.
    SED 597 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. A review of theory and current research concerning the growth and development of the individual through the life span with emphasis placed on childhood and adolescence. The course attempts to relate theory and research to present concerns and problems of teachers through the study of physiological, psychological and social interrelationships. Experience in the procedures of child study are provided.
    *SED 598 INTERNSHIP IN SECONDARY TEACHING. This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines.
    *SED 599 INTERNSHIP IN SECONDARY TEACHING. This course is designed for the student who possesses a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university, has met all requirements for admission to the teacher education program, and is eligible for an internship as defined by the Texas Education Agency guidelines.
    SED 665 INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA. The course is designed to provide experienced teachers the opportunity to examine and produce instructional materials including educational television. Each teacher completes all objectives of the course within the scope of his/her own academic teaching field. The course also involves the study of research findings and the analysis of innovative practices in the use of teaching media. Prerequisite: EED/SED 383.
    SED 667 INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT AND COACHING STRATEGIES FOR THE MENTOR TEACHER. This course is designed to enhance the supervisory and instructional skills of experienced teachers and provide strategies for them to use in the mentoring of beginning teachers. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of the research on effective teaching, the role of teacher mentor and the use of the coaching model.
    SED 670 CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND REFLECTION FOR TEACHING. This course is designed for classroom teachers of all subject and grade levels. The focus of this course is to prepare teachers to read published research critically, to integrate those findings with personal experience in order to make reflective instructional decisions and to participate in pedagogical research and theory-building.

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    DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND COUNSELING

    GRADUATE COURSES

    ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    ASE 510 SCHOOL ADMINISTRATOR WORKSHOP. This course deals with current topics in school administration. One semester hour is earned and the course may be repeated.
    ASE 532 ADMINISTRATION AND ORGANIZATION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. This course deals with the basic activities of educational management, theories and concepts, organization, and governance of the public schools.
    ASE 563 SCHOOL SUPPORT SERVICES. Study is made of the management of school services for which the chief administrator of an educational unit is responsible. Topics considered include attendance accounting, financial accounting, property accounting, and general administrative details.
    ASE 572 FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL SCHOOL LAW. The course provides a study of the legal basis of school control; the relation of the federal government to public education, the state as the fundamental legal unit in organization and administration of a state system of schools; the district as the unit of local school control; and legal duties and responsibilities of the state and local boards of education. Prerequisite: ASE 532.
    ASE 578 CURRICULUM PLANNING. This course provides a study of the various factors which influence curriculum change; the role and responsibilities of different personnel and agencies in curriculum planning; procedures in implementing curriculum change; and current programs in public school curriculum K-12.
    ASE 579 METHODS OF RESEARCH. Study is made of types and methods of educational research, the collecting, analyzing and sharing of data with the public. The student is expected to complete a research project or field study utilizing appropriate methods of educational research.
    ASE 586 SPECIAL POPULATIONS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS. Study is made of special programs offered in public schools including special and compensatory education, bilingual and ESL education, adult and continuing education, and vocational and technical education. Prerequisite: ASE 532.
    ASE 587 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION. The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.
    ASE 630 PUBLIC INFORMATION AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS. This is a study of systems for the development of school-community relations and an understanding of the school's purposes, functions, achievements and needs to the patrons. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Mid-Management core course work.
    ASE 660 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING. Study is made of the principles of psychology as they apply to learning and teaching. Pertinent research is studied in an attempt to find ways to make instruction more effective. Prerequisite: ASE 532.
    ASE 662 PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION (MID-MANAGEMENT). This laboratory course is designed to provide intensive study and field experience in problems relating to a specific job at the elementary, middle or senior high school level. Prerequisites: Final semester of certification work.
    ASE 664 SCHOOL FINANCE. This course deals with basic concepts of public finance; problems in local, state, and federal support of education; state financial systems, with emphasis on Texas; local taxation; budgeting; financing capital items; and fiscal management. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Mid-Management core course work.
    ASE 668 SUPERVISION IN THE SCHOOL. The course focuses on leadership for the improvement of instruction and includes current research on school and teaching effectiveness. Prerequisite: ASE 532.
    ASE 671 ROLE OF THE PRINCIPAL IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. This course is designed for school administrators and supervisors. Consideration is given to organization, program curriculum, plant supervision, and evaluation for the principal functioning at the elementary, middle or senior high school level. Prerequisite: ASE 532.
    ASE 672 PRACTICUM IN SUPERVISION. This course provides a field practicum for students seeking certification as an instructional supervisor. It is designed to provide intensive study of the field of school supervision. Prerequisite: Final semester of certification work.
    ASE 673 PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION (SUPERINTENDENCY). The course provides a study of the duties and responsibilities of the school administrator as related to public relations, personnel administration, instructional leadership, financial management and school plant planning. Prerequisite: Final semester of certification work.
    ASE 690 THE SCHOOL PLANT. The course is designed for school superintendents, business managers, and other school personnel whose responsibilities include school plant planning and management. Topics considered include how to use and maintain present school plants, keeping the school board and community informed as to building needs, selecting architects, and financing construction, and the developing educational specifications. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Mid-Management core course work.
    ASE 694 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPERVISION: LEADERSHIP, EVALUATION AND ADVANCED TOPICS. This course is designed to certify individuals as having completed Instructional Leadership Training. Emphasis is also placed on the improvement of instruction through research findings and demonstration of instructional improvement in various curricular offerings. Prerequisite: ASE 668.
    ASE 695 PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION. Study is made of the administrator's role in recruiting and retaining adequate staff. Such topics as recruitment, salary policy, tenure, leaves, contractual obligations, and academic freedom are considered. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Mid-Management core course work.
    ASE 696 TEACHER APPRAISAL AND DEVELOPMENT. This course is designed to prepare individuals to assess the effectiveness of instruction. Emphasis is also placed on evaluation techniques, conferencing with teachers and development of professional growth plans. Prerequisite: ASE 694.
    ASE 697 CURRENT ISSUES FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. This course will provide practicing and prospective school administrators an opportunity to become current with site and national education issues. These issues will include school finance, school law, special programs, leadership and management, instructional issues, evaluation of programs and personnel, and changing policies at the state and national level. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

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    COUNSELING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    CNE 533 INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE. Study is made of the social, cultural, and economic changes which influence the life styles of the various populations in America today. The services provided in a comprehensive program of guidance and counseling are discussed.
    CNE 534 EFFECTIVE HUMAN BEHAVIOR. A study is made of the dynamics of human behavior with emphasis on understanding dysfunction as well as the basic nature of human beings who successfully cope with the problems that confront them in everyday life. Attention is given to development of emotional health in personal and social contexts such as home, school, work, and marriage. Prerequisite: PSY/SED/EED 597.
    CNE 564 THEORIES OF COUNSELING. A comprehensive study is made of the major theories of counseling. Attention is given to systematic ways of viewing the counseling process. Divergences and convergences among theories are examined for practical application. Prerequisites: CNE 533, CNE 663 and PSY/SED/EED 597.
    CNE 570 CAREER COUNSELING ACROSS THE LIFESPAN. This course is designed to assist the counselor in developing and initiating a comprehensive career education program. A study is made of the world of work as well as the dynamics and developmental aspects of vocational choice. Emphasis is also placed on the use of occupational information, test scores, personal data, grades, and other pertinent information in working with students individually and in groups. Prerequisites: CNE 533 and PSY/EED/SED 597.
    CNE 579 METHODS OF RESEARCH. Study is made of types and methods of educational research, the collecting, analyzing and sharing of data with the pubic. The student is expected to complete a research project or field study utilizing appropriate methods of educational research.
    CNE 585 PRE-PRACTICUM TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING. This course is designed to provide experiences in the exploration and application of individual counseling techniques. Role-playing, self-exploration, and structuring of the counseling relationship are emphasized. Prerequisites: CNE 533 and PSY/EED/SED 597.
    CNE 587 WORKSHOP IN COUNSELING. This course is designed to serve the needs of in-service counselors in schools and those in private practice. Topics will vary as needs demand. May be repeated as scheduled topics vary.
    CNE 591 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT COUNSELING. This course is designed to help students develop approaches for putting counseling theories into practice in helping children and adolescents who are experiencing difficulties in their developmental, personal and social growth. Prerequisites: CNE 533, CNE 564, CNE 663, CNE 674, and SED 597.
    *CNE 592 CROSS CULTURAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING. This course will examine the sociocultural characteristics and counseling issues related to the varied cultures in today's society. Hispanic, African-American, Native American, and Asian American cultures will be examined along with issues related to gender and Gay/Lesbian concerns. Prerequisites: EED/SED/PSY 597, CNE 533, CNE 564, and CNE 674.
    CNE 595 INDIVIDUAL TESTS OF INTELLIGENCE. The course provides supervised instruction and practice in the administration, scoring, reporting of results, and interpretation of selected individual intelligence tests such as the Wechsler Scales. Prerequisites: CNE 663 or PSY 594 and admission to a Special Certificate or Licensure program.
    CNE 599 PLAY THERAPY BASICS. This course is designed to enhance/increase the counselor's understanding of the child's world as perceived by the child, the relationship between the child's world and behavior. The major theories of play therapy, and the utilization of play media to facilitate the child's self-exploration, self-expression, self-understanding, and personal growth will be explored. Prerequisite: CNE 564.
    CNE 631 ADVANCED PLAY THERAPY. This course is designed to provide play therapists with extensive practical research experience in regard to issues relative to the play therapy relationship. Case analysis, theoretical application, and current research issues and trends will be investigated. Prerequisite: CNE 599 or approval of instructor.
    CNE 632 THEORIES OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY. This course focuses on basic concepts in marriage and family therapy, theories of therapeutic change in families, marriage and family development and foundations of family systems therapy. Prerequisite: CNE 564.
    *CNE 633 TECHNIQUES OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY. Application of the main approaches in family therapy to clinical work this includes skill development in working with couples and families in a variety of contexts. Prerequisite: CNE 632.
    *CNE 634 PROFESSIONAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN COUNSELING. This course studies the current ethical issues and professional role of marriage and family therapists, mental health counselors and school counselors. This includes study of the Texas Family Code, the licensing acts for Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Counselors, and regulations for school counselors. Prerequisite: CNE 585.
    CNE 635 METHODS OF CONSULTATION, COORDINATION, AND COUNSELING. A comprehensive study is made of contemporary practices of consultation and coordination in the counseling profession. The course includes study of community service agencies, referral sources, legal and ethical practices, knowledge of theories of consultation and the acquisition of consultation skills. Prerequisites: CNE 534, CNE 564, and CNE 663.
    CNE 636 FIELD PRACTICUM. The course provides supervised experiences in a counseling setting. Study is made of the duties and responsibilities of the counselor at work. Prerequisites: CNE 676 and subject to individual placement.
    CNE 663 ASSESSMENT IN GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING. Study will include the principles of assessment and evaluation in counseling, assessment instruments used in the counseling services, elementary statistical concepts, methods of evaluating assessment instruments, the process of synthesizing and interpreting assessment data, and the ethics of assessment. Prerequisites: CNE 564 and CNE 585.
    CNE 674 PRACTICUM IN GROUP COUNSELING. Participation in small group activities is a significant part of this course which has been designed to meet the needs of counselors in a variety of settings. The didactic portion of the course will focus on the knowledge, practice, skills, and person of the effective group counselor. Prerequisites: CNE 564 and CNE 585.
    CNE 676 SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN COUNSELING. This laboratory course is designed to prepare the student in the practical application and integration of the principles and methods of counseling. Prerequisites: CNE 570, CNE 585, and CNE 663.

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    DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE, LITERACY, AND SPECIAL POPULATIONS

    GRADUATE COURSES


    COURSES FOR CERTIFICATION IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

    BSL 565 APPLIED LINGUISTICS FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS. The scope of this course relates to the language sciences as they apply to formal and informal instruction. Language situation, descriptions, criteria, population, variations, and linguistic pressures are investigated. The nature of language and language teaching are examined and studied. Language theory and learning theory are examined in an attempt to provide a sound second language pedagogy.
    BSL 571 SOCIAL, CULTURAL AND LANGUAGE INFLUENCE ON LEARNING. This course helps describe languages, differences between languages, predictions of difficulties faced by a language learner, and helps teachers develop strategies to deal with the needs of second language learners from varied linguistic backgrounds. It examines sociocultural factors in the language classroom, interpersonal relations, concepts, models, and strategies for pluralistic teaching.
    BSL 574 TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: ORAL LANGUAGE COMMUNICATION. This course covers the nature of language; the structure of language, the nature of first and second language acquisition; possible areas of interference; student motivation; trends in effective teaching materials and procedures; observation, testing and evaluation techniques; and the significance of culture.
    BSL 575 TEACHING THE LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING IN SPANISH. Emphasis is placed on nine areas which include rationale, techniques, approaches, culture, activities and methods of teaching reading in Spanish in the elementary bilingual classroom.
    BSL 576 BILINGUAL PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTENT AREAS. This course is designed to cover basic teaching principles in the areas of science, mathematics, and social studies; the organization and structure of bilingual programs; guidelines for language usage; staffing, scheduling, and physical organization; and learning styles, teaching strategies and use of auxiliary personnel specific to the bilingual classroom.
    BSL 577 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT FOR BILINGUAL AND ESL PROGRAMS. A study is made of the development of speech in children; the neurophysiological implications for second language learning; the cognitive, affective and social variables in second language acquisition; practice, transfer, feedback, recall and transfer processes; specific student needs, including individualization of instruction; and mastery of conduct and classroom climate.
    *BSL 587 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION: BILINGUAL EDUCATION. The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.

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    EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    ECE 539 DEVELOPMENT OF LANGUAGE IN THE YOUNG CHILD. A study is made of the current theories, research, and myths surrounding the development of language in the young child. Students will examine language programs and prepare appropriate language materials for preschool/primary children.
    ECE 566 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE YOUNG CHILD. An examination of theory and current research concerning the growth and development of the individual through the eighth year of life is made. The course attempts to relate theory and research to present concerns of individuals in the helping profession through the study of intellectual, psychological, and social interrelationships. Experiences in the procedures of child study is provided.
    ECE 580 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION I: FOUNDATIONS. Study is made of the historical and philosophical roots of early childhood education from the middle ages to contemporary practice. An in-depth study of the ideas of Maria Montessori and Jean Piaget, the history of Head Start, and current trends in the field will be an integral part of the course.
    ECE 581 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION II: CURRICULUM. Study is made of the scope and sequence of learning experiences for young children. Current research on early childhood curriculum development and model programs is examined. The essential elements for kindergarten and prekindergarten are presented.
    ECE 582 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION III: METHODS. The course includes planning, developing and utilizing materials with young children. Laboratory experience is provided.
    *ECE 587 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.
    ECE 669 PRACTICUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. This course provides supervised practicum experiences in early childhood settings. The course is designed for the graduate student who is seeking initial certification and is an elective for other students. Student may be employed by a school district while enrolled in the practicum.

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    READING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
    RDG 530 SURVEY OF READING. The results of research related to such topics as readiness, phonics, meaning, individualized instruction, grouping, interests, retardation, reading and the other subject areas are considered in solving current problems in the field of reading. Prerequisite: RDG 370.
    RDG 532 PRACTICUM IN LITERACY ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTION. This course is designed to provide practicum experiences for classroom teachers in the informal assessment of reading skills and in implementation of corrective teaching.
    RDG 583 DEVELOPING LITERACY FOR RELUCTANT LEARNERS. This course provides a repertoire of activities to develop reading/writing skills of upper elementary and middle school learners. Students will be provided experiences with the selection of appropriate instructional materials and approaches, based on the cognitive, social, and academic needs of students, grades 5-12.
    RDG 587 WORKSHOP IN READING. This course will provide the opportunity for relevant and timely workshops and independent research and study.
    RDG 588 LANGUAGE AND LITERACY ASSESSMENT. This course provides techniques for diagnosing and remediating reading problems. Students are introduced to and use various formal and informal diagnostic instruments. Strategies are presented which provide a foundation for making sound instructional decisions related to needs revealed in diagnosis. Prerequisites: RDG 569 or RDG 532, EED 593 or SED 593, teaching experience.
    RDG 589 IMPROVEMENT OF LITERACY IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND ADULT POPULATIONS. This course is designed to prepare secondary classroom teachers and reading specialists for teaching reading in the secondary school. Content includes characteristics of secondary students, language patterns and structures common to various subject-area texts and techniques to teach reading and study strategies through content areas.
    RDG 598 COGNITION AND EMERGENT LITERACY. This course will provide an opportunity to examine language, cognition, and pre-reading skills of young children. It will enable the student to understand, develop, and evaluate language and reading programs for young children.
    RDG 638 ADVANCED STUDY IN LANGUAGE AND LITERACY. This course is designed to present current theories and research regarding aspects of literacy and oral and written language. This knowledge is related to instructional applications for classrooms for the literacy development of children and students.
    RDG 675 THE ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF LITERACY PROGRAMS. This course examines the organization, development, implementation and improvement of reading and writing programs in public schools grade K through 12 at classroom, building and district levels.
    RDG 688 PSYCHOLOGICAL, SOCIOLOGICAL, AND POLITICAL ASPECTS OF LITERACY. This course presents psychological, developmental, and language factors that affect reading and school achievement. Consideration is given to all language processes--listening, speaking, writing, and reading--as suggested by current theories and research.

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    SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
    SPD 535 THE EDUCATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN AND YOUTH. The course is designed to familiarize teachers and administrators with the characteristics, problems and educational needs of children who are exceptional.
    SPD 536 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION. This course presents the history and philosophy of early childhood special education; atypical development of young children with an emphasis on birth through age five; and an overview on the psychology of families and young children with special needs. Prerequisite: SPD 535 or SPD 231.
    SPD 537 ASSESSMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. An overview of formal and informal assessment for special education and remedial teachers including basic concepts of measurement; assessment of academic achievement; screening tools; diagnostic testing in reading, math, and language; individual and group intelligence tests; assessment of perceptual-motor skills, sensory acuity, and adaptive behavior.
    SPD 538 SPECIAL METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR THE MENTALLY RETARDED. Study is made of the curriculum, methods, and materials suited to teaching exceptional children. Topics considered include perception, language, cognition, and motor development. Prerequisite: SPD 535.
    SPD 562 ADVANCED STUDY OF MENTAL RETARDATION. A study is made of the nature, causes, and treatment of children with learning problems, mental retardation, and/or other cognitive deficits. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and divisional approval.
    SPD 567 SEMINAR IN LEARNING DISABILITIES. Study is made of research findings in learning disabilities, theories and systems.
    SPD 568 TEACHING METHODS FOR THE DISABLED LEARNER. Course content centers upon a rationale for instruction of learning disabled students, an examination of a variety of methods, materials, and instructional strategies in learning disabilities.
    SPD 569 METHODS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION. This course addresses interventions related to curricular and instructional modification; assessment of young children with special needs; multidisciplinary, inter-agency, and family teaming and coordination; and assistive technology and adaptive devices. Prerequisite: SPD 536.
    SPD 587 WORKSHOP IN EDUCATION. The topic(s) included will vary with academic program and semester offered.
    SPD 631 A STUDY OF BEHAVIOR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN. This course will focus on theories, characteristics, and treatment of mild, moderate, and severe behavioral disorders in children. Issues involving definition, classification and remediation of such disorders as aggression, autism, depression, and delinquency will be covered.
    SPD 637 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT AND PARENT INVOLVEMENT IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. Practical techniques for managing student behavior and for facilitating parent involvement in the education of exceptional students will be presented. Classroom management techniques for various disruptive, withdrawn, and deficient behaviors will be emphasized. Prerequisite: SPD 535.
    SPD 639 PRACTICUM IN TEACHING YOUNG CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. This practicum provides the environment where the student can demonstrate competencies developed in previous courses by working with young children with special needs. Prerequisites: SPD 536 and SPD 569.
    SPD 677 APPRAISAL OF INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN. This course provides supervised instruction and practice in the administration, scoring, reporting of results, and interpretation of appropriate individual tests for young children and the mentally retarded. Adaptive behavior scales are included. Prerequisites: CNE 595 and SPD 678.
    SPD 678 SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. This course provides an opportunity to examine and to become trained to administer tests currently being used to identify children for special education. It is specifically designed for students to become educational diagnosticians. Prerequisites: SPD 677 and CNE 595.
    SPD 679 PRACTICUM FOR EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSTICIANS. This course provides a field-based practicum under the direction of a certified educational diagnostician. It is designed to provide intensive study in the role of the educational diagnostician. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

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    COURSES FOR ENDORSEMENT IN GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATION

    SPD 573 EDUCATION OF THE GIFTED AND TALENTED CHILD. This course addresses theories and characteristics of gifted, talented, and creative students, while surveying the various types of programs and instructional arrangements for these students.
    SPD 632 RESEARCH AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT FOR THE GIFTED AND TALENTED. The field of gifted and talented education will be examined through a variety of research topics and issues which are of current interest. Administrative aspects of planning, developing and evaluating gifted programs will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: SPD 573.
    SPD 633 ELEMENTARY METHODS FOR TEACHING THE GIFTED AND TALENTED. The process of planning and implementing instruction for the gifted and talented will be the focus. Emphasis will be placed on meeting the diverse needs of elementary students across a variety of domains including the academic, creative and affective. Prerequisite: SPD 573.
    SPD 634 SECONDARY METHODS FOR TEACHING THE GIFTED AND TALENTED. This course will introduce teachers to models for identifying gifted in their classes; for planning interactive curriculum and processes in the cognitive, affective, academic and psychomotor domains; for motivating students through state of the art technology to high level thinking, problem solving, research and production. Prerequisite: SPD 573.
    SPD 661 PRACTICUM: GIFTED EDUCATION. This course provides a field-based practicum experience for teachers working with students who are gifted and/or talented. Prerequisites: SPD 573, 632, 633, 634.

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    TEACHING CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

    NOTICE


    The State Board of Education may mandate changes in certification programs which may become effective for students enrolled in the University under this catalogue. Such changes may affect the graduation and certification requirements listed in this catalogue.


    Deficiency Plan Fee Policy
    The fee scale described below is for the preparation of a deficiency plan leading to teacher certification. All fees are payable to Sam Houston State University by cashier's check or money order.
    (No refunds made.)
    $30 Non-SHSU graduates
    $15 SHSU graduates (bachelor's or master's degree)
    Professional Certificates: Since most professional certificates are earned as the result of completing a graduate degree program, very few deficiency plans are required for these certificates. A person who holds a master's degree and wants to add a professional certificate should contact the Certification Officer.

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    PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES

    The professional teacher certificate programs approved for this university are for elementary classroom teachers and secondary classroom teachers.

    Elementary Classroom Teacher. The program for the Professional Elementary Teacher Certificate includes the completion of 12 semester hours in a subject in which the applicant has at least 24 undergraduate semester hours; 6 semester hours in elementary school content subjects or resource area; 6 semester hours of Education selected from
    EED 584, EED 593, EED 597, ASE 660 and all other requirements for the master's degree.
    Secondary Classroom Teacher. The program for the Professional Secondary Teacher Certificate includes the completion of 12 semester hours in a subject in which the applicant has at least 24 undergraduate semester hours or in Library Science which requires no prerequisite; 6 semester hours in a second teaching field or resource area; 6 semester hours selected from SED 536, SED 560, SED 593, SED 594, SED 597, ASE 660 and all other requirements for a master's degree.
    Since all professional certificates are based upon a master's degree and are intended to prepare one for professional positions in Texas public schools, it is required that the applicant for a professional certificate be the holder of the appropriate provisional certificate.
    The official application for a professional teaching certificate must be approved by the Teacher Certification Officer. Certificates are valid for life unless canceled by lawful authority. An applicant for a professional certificate must meet the following requirements:
    1. Complete a program for a master's degree.
    2. Complete the approved program for the professional certificate sought with a minimum of a �B� average in all course work in Education and the teaching field(s).
    3. Complete three years of teaching experience.
    4. Pay an application fee of $65.

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    SPECIAL CERTIFICATES AND ENDORSEMENTS

    The special certificate programs approved for this university are for Correctional Institution Employees, Educational Diagnosticians, Learning Resources Specialists, Reading Specialists, School Administrators, School Counselors, School Supervisors, and Visiting Teachers.
    The candidate for a special certificate is required to have completed twelve semester hours of required graduate course work with grades of �B� or better before he is eligible for admission to a special certificate program. Admission to special certificate programs is not permitted without adequate and reliable information concerning the candidate. Factors in reaching a decision on an applicant include:
    1. Quality of applicant's completed graduate work.
    2. Results of tests, standardized and others, which may be required.
    3. Information from public school administrators concerning the candidate's success as a teacher and probable success in the field for which the candidate is seeking special certification.
    4. Recommendations from University faculty members who have known the candidate as a student.

    An applicant for a special certificate must meet the following requirements:
    1. Complete a program for a master's degree.
    2. Complete the approved program for the specified certificate with a minimum of a �B� average in the required course work.
    3. Complete the teaching and/or work experience as required for the specific certificate.
    4. Pay an application fee of $30.

    Educational Diagnostician. Certified classroom teachers desiring to function as Educational Diagnosticians must complete a 45-hour semester program encompassing a master's degree, Plan III. To be eligible for this professional certificate the student must complete the following course work: SPD 535, SPD 537, SPD 538, SPD 562, SPD 567, SPD 637, SPD 677, SPD 678, SPD 679, CNE 595, ASE 660, RDG 532, RDG 588, EED/SED 593, EED/SED 597.
    Learning Resources Specialist. This program replaced the Professional School Librarian Certificate Program effective August 31, 1979. Additional information is included in the Department of Library Science section of this catalogue.
    Reading Specialist. Students desiring to work as an all-level Reading Specialist should complete Plan III for the Master of Education degree with an 21-hour major in Reading including RDG 532, RDG 530, RDG 588, RDG 589, RDG 688 and a 15-hour composite minor including SED/EED 593, SED/EED 597, EED 565, LS 560 and a curriculum course. Three years successful teaching experience is required.
    School Administrator. The program for the Mid-Management Administrators Certificate requires the completion of a minimum of 45 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree and includes the following: ASE 532, 563, 572, 578, 579, 586, 662, 668, 671, 694; nine semester hours from ASE 510, 630, 660, 664, 695, 696; and six semester hours from SOC 565, 571 or 576; POL 561 or 585, SPD 535; PSY 597; CS 596 or 560; or CJ 660 or 577.
    The program for the Professional Certificate for School Superintendent requires the completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree and includes the following: completion of the 45 semester hours required for the Mid-Management Certificate plus ASE 630, 664, 673, 690, 695. Electives will be substituted for any required courses which were completed as part of the Mid-Management Certificate.
    School Counselor. The Texas Education Agency issues one certificate, the Professional School Counselor Certificate, to individuals who have completed an approved program in counseling. Students desiring the complete counselor certification should complete Plan III for the Master of Education degree including CNE 533, 534, 564, 570, 585, 635, 674, 676; ASE 597; SED/EED 597; CNE 663 or PSY 594; and three hours from ASE 660; CNE 587, 595, 599; PSY 530, 531, 534.
    Students desiring to work as vocational counselors should complete Plan III for the Master of Education degree with a 24-hour major in Education including CNE 533, 564, 585, 674, 676; SED/EED 597; CNE 663 or PSY 594; ASE 579 or VED 568; and 12-hour minor in Vocational Education including VED 562, 567, 575, and 585. Applicants must have approval of vocational or work experience background.
    School Supervisor. Students desiring to work as elementary or secondary regular supervisors should complete Plan III for the Master of Education degree with a 24-hour major in Education including ASE 532, 578, 579, 586, 660, 668, 672, 694 and a 12-hour minor in a teaching field or a 12-hour composite minor with a minimum of six semester hours in a teaching field.
    Students desiring to work in vocational supervision must hold a master's degree including ASE 668; VED 568, 575, 580, 585, 588; and 12 hours from ASE 578, 586, 660, 672, 694; SED/EED 593; VED 565; plus three years teaching experience in a TEA approved public school vocational education program which prepares students for gainful employment.
    Visiting Teacher. Certified classroom teachers who wish to qualify as Visiting Teachers may do so by completing an approved 36-semester-hour program leading to a master's degree. Additional information is available from the Office of Graduate Studies, College of Education and Applied Science, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas 77341.
    Licensed Professional Counselor. The Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors, Texas Department of Health, issues the Licensed Professional Counselor License to individuals who have completed an approved program in counseling and the necessary work hours. Students desiring to complete the Licensed Professional Counselor License may complete either the forty-five hour Master of Education Plan III degree or the forty-five hour Master of Arts Plan I degree. A major of twenty-seven to thirty-three hours includes: CNE 533, 564, 570, 585, 635, 636, 663, 674, 676. A minor of twelve to eighteen hours may be chosen from Education or Psychology courses.

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    ENDORSEMENTS
    BR> Bilingual Endorsement. The following courses can be used as a minor field or electives on the degrees listed above and can lead to additional certification or an Endorsement in Bilingual Education: BSL 574, 575, 576, and 577. Additional requirements include the Texas Oral Proficiency Test--Spanish and the ExCET in Bilingual Education. Contact the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations for details.
    English as a Second Language Endorsement. The following courses can be used as minor field or electives on the degrees listed above and can lead to additional certification or an Endorsement in English as a Second Language: BSL 565, 571, 574, 577. Additional requirements include the ExCET in ESL. Contact the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations for details.
    Gifted and Talented Endorsement. The following courses in Special Education can be used s a minor field or electives on the degrees listed above and can lead to an Endorsement in that area: SPD 573, 632, 633, and 661. Contact the Department of Language, Literacy, and Special Populations for details.

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    DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY AND PHOTOGRAPHY

    The graduate programs in Industrial Technology are designed to provide advanced training for professional and managerial positions in teaching and occupations related to industry. The curriculum is organized to permit advanced study and research in Industrial Technology.
    Authorized degree programs are: Master of Arts degree with a major in Industrial Technology and a Master of Arts degree with a major in Industrial Education.

    Master of Arts, Plan I. This degree is designed primarily for prospective college and secondary school teachers. Students selecting this plan may complete a minimum of twelve semester hours in the major field and twelve semester hours in a minor field. A six-hour thesis in the major field is required for the thirty-hour program. Twelve semester hours in the major field may be substituted for the thesis.
    Master of Arts in Industrial Technology, Plan II. This degree is designed to provide advanced training for professional and managerial positions in industry. A student selecting this plan may complete twenty-four hours in Industrial Technology and twelve hours in a supporting field approved by his/her academic advisor. A thesis may be elected for a thirty-hour program.

    All 400 level courses (except IT 490) will be offered for graduate credit upon the consent of the student's academic advisor. The student may apply a maximum of 6 hours of 400 level courses toward the master's degree.

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    GRADUATE COURSES

    INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
    IE 531 GRADUATE HUMAN RELATIONSHIP FOR VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL INDUSTRIAL TEACHERS. This course is designed to meet the needs of the competent tradesman in better understanding of and working with students. Parallel course to IE 431.
    IE 565 METHODS AND MEDIA IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION. Success in most professional areas is dependent in part on the ability of an individual to communicate effectively with others. An inventory of media used in communications will be made. Various means and equipment for aiding communications of ideas will be studied and evaluated. Also listed as VED 573.
    IE 577 GRADUATE PROBLEMS IN COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS. This is a continuation of the �coordination techniques� course in order to provide the student an opportunity to pursue further in-depth study of the developments and unique problems of a part time program.
    IE 579 INSTRUCTIONAL/PRODUCTION ANALYSIS. This course is a study of the inventory and analysis procedure by which the essential elements of an occupation or production scheduling activity are identified and listed for instruction or production purposes. The analysis determines the instructional or production format necessary for a smooth and orderly process from the simple to the complex order of tasks, operation and jobs required in the industrial environment.
    IE 582 VOCATIONAL STUDENT IDENTIFICATION AND FOLLOW-UP. Techniques for identifying students for vocational training; sources and means of job placement for co-operative part-time students and graduates of vocational programs; and methods of making student follow-up studies are included. Also listed as VED 567.
    IE 586 TEACHING AIDS IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. This course is designed to aid teachers of industrial subjects in the design and construction of teaching aids. The study of multi-media is an integral and important phase of this course.
    IE 591 LABORATORY ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. This course is designed for graduates who are going to teach Industrial Education or manage equipment and supplies in industry. It is to prepare students to successfully manage laboratory activities, organize laboratories in accordance with contemporary concepts, and to control materials/supplies within their laboratories. Parallel course to IE 491.

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    INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
    IT 568 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. This course is designed to provide the opportunities for in-depth study of the historical background of the industrial education movement.
    IT 590 DIRECTED STUDIES. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain specialized experience in one or more of the following areas. (a) Internship, (b) Laboratory Procedures, (c) Individualized Study, (d) Innovative Curriculum, (e) Workshops, (f) Specialized Training Schools, (g) Seminar. In the internship and laboratory procedures segment, the student will gain organization and management techniques through observation and participation in conducting classroom activities and associated laboratory experience. The student may gain experience in a maximum of two areas of competency. In the individualized studies segment, the student will select a problem and work under the direction of a major professor. 1-6 hours, may be repeated or taken concurrently for a maximum of six hours. (Area of study to be indicated on transcript.)
    IT 631 PLANT LAYOUT AND MATERIALS HANDLING. A study of the methods in planning and control of production; operation analysis; routing; scheduling and dispatching; production charts and boards; inventory control; accumulation of material requirements; and use of critical path techniques used in industry.
    IT 633 QUALITY CONTROL. Methods and procedures employed in industrial quality control, theories of measurement, error, prediction, sampling, test of significance and models.
    IT 634 MATERIALS TEST TECHNOLOGY. A study of internal stresses and deformation of bodies resulting from the action of external forces; concepts and techniques of testing tensile, compression, shear, transverse, hardness and the elasticity on various materials and fasteners.
    IT 635 PRINCIPLES AND TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. A study of the basic principles of research and the techniques of application as related to Industrial Education.
    IT 698,699 THESIS. This course involves, besides the preliminary study of the techniques of research, bibliography, and organization of material, the selection of a suitable problem, a digest of the related literature, the selection of appropriate procedure, the formulation of a plan of investigation and report, the collection and organization of data, and the writing of the thesis.


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